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Tuesday
Oct052010

Are Some Companies Ignoring the Equal Pay Act?

I have always believed in equal opportunities and this certainly extends to the area of pay as well. The CMI (Chartered Management Institute) released a report at the end of August this year that pointed to some alarming discoveries in business.

As far as managers are concerned, it has been estimated that it might take as long as 57 years before pay between the sexes becomes equal. When you consider the Equal Pay Act has already been around for decades, it is quite alarming that this should be the case.

I regularly deal with all kinds of clients and their tax affairs, and I therefore have to know how much each person earns to be able to process their tax returns effectively and correctly. I can attest to the fact that earnings between the sexes are indeed very far from being balanced.

It would seem that women feel unable to ask for pay rises when the time feels right to do so. But I wonder whether they should have to ask in the first place. Surely pay levels for both sexes should be exactly the same without having to ask for the privilege?

Of course people should be able to ask for pay rises if they feel they deserve them. But it is disappointing to know the gap between the sexes is still bigger than it should be.

If you feel you need advice regarding your tax situation or how much you are paying in accordance with your income, contact the tax experts at St Matthew now.

 



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